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, lieutenant government gavin newsome. it (applause) at the thank you. >> also represent state mark malone's office tom ammiano. (applause) * >> all will return momentarily, i'm sure. paul henderson, representing mayor ed lee's office. [laughter] >> and to my right, i have the open house, our state association vice president and i'm sure other names, past president san francisco chapter. we have lots of our membership here including a couple of board members, kerry greenberg from fresno. [speaker not understood] is here. we have two representatives from san mateo county, barbara arieta and mike miller. i know people. at this time i'd like to say a few words about the california grand jurors association. it's an all volunteer group, 501(c) (3) dedicated to promoting the participation in the grand jury system, qualifies applicants to be grand jurors, bidthv awareness so we have consumers of the grand jury's product, report. at this point i'd like to turn it over for some lengthy introductions. >> thank you. thank you, keith. welcome, everybody. we're glad to see so many friendly faces. as pr
. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show us in a very positive way. from my perspective, it's important for us to
around the same product. you still have government supervisors, identical technology, identical procedures, they don't seem to think it's going to save us that much money. so, just a question of whose pocket the paycheck is coming out of. >> it's not only saving, it's improving efficiency. privatization bet center >> hand it to the airlines. if american airlines doesn't protect its passengers it goes out of business. if the tsa doesn't protect the passengers it gets more funding. we have an incentive problem. in the private sector you are forced to do better. in the government you are rewarded. >> bill, do incentives matter here as they do most places? >> maybe but i say no, don't give privatization a bad name by assigning it an activity which is an expensive mess no matter who undertakes it. i would rather have john and steve use their powers of persuasion and libertarian instincts to apply to another need. privatize elementary schools. >> a subject for another conversation. we'll have that conversation. mike, by the way to clarify to, the tsa denied wrong doing with this marin
. can you imagine how this is going to northbound this is a nightmare. this is so the federal government can hire millions of people to make this legislation possible. it's idiotic. they should break it and start all over. >> 2200 pages turned into 20,000 so far. i remember when president clinton saiddy not have sex with that woman. president obama setd this will not add a single dime to the deficit. >> look, it's going to bring down health care costs. it's amazing people hate so much something that has barely taken effect. most hasn't gone into effect. the american people when asked about the specific provisions in the affordable care act like it. they like tax credits for small businesses to pay for insurance, they like cling the medicare donut hole, they like kids staying on insurance. 80% of people like those and less than 50% know they are in the bill. so stop smearing the bill to tell people wh's really in it. >> talk about why this didn't kick in. we had to wait until it got voted back in. they wrote this so that once he's in all the crabby stuff comes out. stuff we're two years i
, and a prime minister who has managed to establish control over a fractious government? or is it all those things? this is not a discussion rooted in the past. we will not relive the wmd questions. we will not dwell on the mistakes of the coalition authority, and we will not debate the surge. andill look at iraq today where it is headed. a has been little of that in the 10 years media coverage, even though it is a far more relevant question for policy makers and the public today. with that, because you did not come here to hear me today, that we introduce the plan all. you on the who they are. you know their contributions to the efforts to stabilize iraq. to my right is ambassador ryan crocker, who is the kissinger senior fellow at the el universal. he has served recently as our ambassador to afghanistan, his long career included ambassadors for iraq as well as our ambassador to pakistan, syria, kuwait, and lebanon. from may to august of 2003, he served as the government's director for the coalition provisional authority in baghdad, and his career in the foreign service included a tour in
the rebel advance. it is the sort of richer vision government supporters meted out to their attackers could be overtaken by looting. >> they are killing us, raping us, looting. they are not allowing us to live. they have taken the state hostage. ,> seen here in better times has become an unpopular president. he has now suffered the same fate. only 10 weeks after the signing of a new power-sharing peace deal. with the celebrations, there was hope of some desperately needed stability. what was to follow was more death, more chaos and suffering for one of the poorest countries in the world. seneca rebels say they brought the president down because of his failure to deliver on promises. >> there well you -- they are very well organized. when the peace talks failed and they asked specifically for people in jail to be released and also for foreign troops, and ugandan troops to leave their country, one that did not materialize, the rest was history. the president has fled. >> this is a country rich with minerals, gold, but known for his poverty and history of coups and failed peace deals. people a
with the first question. the senate passed this week to keep the government running avoiding a government shutdown. it says aboutink the process going forward for negotiations on some sort of grand bargaining? isthe first thing it shows that we passed an appropriation bill even though -- it was called a continual growth -- resolution. it was an appropriation bill. it had very limited amendment opportunities in it. we are seeing input. the house passed it right after we did. we now have some certainty. the problems for a grand bargaining, let me put in context. what we have done and the agencies for have number and on theire handicapped ability to be successful. they can actually manage the jobs that we asked them to do. it has been a horrible over the last few years. , everybodygaining knows it needs -- what it means to be made of. what is hard to get to is the political dynamics in terms of how it affects collections. -- disease dizzily in washington is people care more about the next election than the future of the country. if we get to a grand bargaining, you would have some people qui
the government fears contagion. it starts doing naughty things. this is limiting how much those folks can take out once they can get out the money. it is enacting sweeping measures that are raising eyebrows worldwide. banks rethinking even being there. paying customers wanting to get out of there. it is a mess. in these next 72 hours, cyprus officials are very lelia. they are working overtime to contain this mess. let me put it this way. cyprus is no longer an island. cyprus is a tsunami. it scares me customers worldwide. that is what they are hoping to avoid this weekend. it depends on whether they deal with this. going to john brown, and our own nicole petallides on whether they can and will. nicole knows of what she speaks. her parents are from cyprus and she has visited there many times or so. these are wholly times. >> i am so glad that you're painting it in the roper way. this is .2% of europe's gdp. it is a small island and it is being menial to so many. but it paints a picture of what is going on there. which is catastrophic. you go in there and you are talking about confiscating peopl
, eyewitnesses said the rebels control strategic locations. foreign forces helping the government also suffered a defeat. the south african soldiers were tasked with guarding bangui. is himself a former soldier. ruleast few months of his were turbulent. his term is not up until 2016. rebels said they want to hold elections. there is still heavy fighting in bangui. a peaceful transition is not on the cards. >> paris musharraf has returned home from self-imposed exile, declaring he was to save the country. musharraf spent the past four years in london and dubai, but now wants to take part in elections this may. >> coming home may herald a comeback for musharraf. greeting supporters after stepping off his flight. i've come back, putting my life in danger, in order to save pakistan. >> not everyone in pakistan is happy he is home. the military man made many enemies as president. in 2008, musharraf was forced to quit amid political turmoil i. his political past could come back to haunt him. pakistan's teledyne hates musharraf because he supported george w. bush's war on terror hatesevision -- taliba
contracts? if they agree what business is a the government to interfere? >> the also got 14 year-old son of the cold wind. there has to be appointed. >> this is the 21st century. john: if you volunteer is that freedom? >> i grabbed as a liberal in the '60s now i am a libertarian democrats these to be press secretary because i in understand the argument how we exploit workers of the world that they need to have the backing of the government demand john pay his interns but these people are not so stupid they cannot decide if they are exploited. it is a contract that is understood. >> no coercive power is used it as a libertarian stream -- dream. john: the obama labor department can now with the explit rules if you don't pay them there is criteria. the employer derives no immediate advantage. [laughter] on occasion the operations must be impeded? i had in turn to impede did my work i tried to get r of them. >> if fox wanted you to do a news show and said do it underpaid and then we throw use and academic credit then we will decide. would you except that? john: maybe not at this point* in my
it requires closer coordination between the government and the central bank as well as a boj chief willing to undertake bold monetary easing. by all accounts, kuroda is his man. >> translator: the japanese economy has been struggling with deflation for nearly 15 years. the greatest mission of the central bank is to end deflation and achieve the inflation target of 2% as soon as possible. >> cue row do da has said he believes the boj can achieve the target within two years and says he'll use every tool at his disposal to make that happen. >> translator: the bank of japan must use all possible means to achieve the 2% inflation target. by expanding monetary easing both in terms of volume and quantity, the 2% inflation target can be achieved. >> joining kuroda are two more deputy governors, kikuo iwata, a former professor and former executive director hiroshi nakaso. iwata is a long time proponent of using a so-called reflation policy to stamp out deflation, like kuroda, he maintains that pumping money into the markets would lift consumer prices. >> translator: my research is focused on studyi
passed this week to keep the government running for this budget year, avoiding a government shutdown. what do you think that says about the process going forward for negotiations on some sort of grand bargain? >> well, the first thing it shows is we actually passed an appropriation bill even though -- called a continuing resolution, the vast majority of what was passed were appropriation bills. so it was kind of an omnibus ppropriation bill. it had very limited amendment opportunity. but i think it's a great thing. the house pass passed it right after we passed it. so we now have some certainty. the problem for a grand bargain, let me put in context first. what we have done by the agencies by having them run on crs for 3 years is we have really handicapped their ability to be effective without giving direction and changes and giving them something to plan ahead on so they can actually manage the job that west coast tasked them to do i think -- we have tasked them to do i think has been horrible over the last three years. a grand bargain, everybody needs -- knows what it needs to be m
setting up the government of national and a national army. is a fairly comprehensive agreement, and they feel that he failed to honor the agreement. we saw the troops fighting. then in january as they were about to make a push on the capitol itself, they attend another agreement to form a government of unity. the rest seems to have broken down. >> peter, speaking to us from nairobi. the former pakistani president has flown home after four years in self imposed exile. pervez musharraf was greeted by supporters. the former military ruler says that he wants to run in the next election and is unfazed by a death threat from the pakistan taliban. former president and general has threatened to come back on many occasions, but he is finally here. he comes home to a very different pakistan and the one that he left. he was a very unpopular figure when he left. here he used to have the support of the main political party. sources are telling us that they are not sure if they will do any kind of deal with him. in order to make this work, to have some kind of success in the general election
the supreme court case. the federal government said we would not join two false claims access cases that would be brought again. >> paul: by private citizens and the department of housing and urban development had wanted the justice department to intervene on behalf of the claimants and perez got them to back off that in turn for st. paul dropping the case. now, what is the theory of racial discrimination is called disparty impact could be-- they worship at the altar of parity and 13% of freshman and 13% of the class and firemen and if not, discrimination can be shown on that basis alone. >> you don't have to prove it in an individual case. >> right, if the policy in place, however race neutral it is, if it's producing disparate outcomes then it's the policy. >> paul: and perez was housing housing law to prosecute banks with this theory. >> that's right. >> paul: and he thought this might be illegal, why? because the disparate is used in some parts, but not in housing. >> it's employment. but they don't have the same language as title vii law and he was afraid at that st. paul would win this c
of the state legislatures, governor's mansions, and there's a difference between state government and the federal government. the absurdity in a state capital, that we did not have a budget for three years, yet here in washington the senate did not pass a budget for three years and the president just not serious about what americans think is the biggest problem of that country. they do not even have a budget for three years? state government, closer to the people, has to get things done. i used to tell trent lott, the difference between governors and senators is senators talk about doing things and governors do things. there's a lot of truth to democrat governors as well. their party is so committed to washington that you do not see many of these governors who are willing to talk the way republican governors are about how we do a better job at the state level. there's much more bipartisanship. i like to think i had a relative success will governorship, but eight of my eight years of governor, i have a democrat house majority, and seven of my years, i had a democrat senate majority
action, are far more likely to get the most positive outcome. call this free government program for the option that's right for you. >> predictions, it gary b. >> i like lululemon. the reason, it's complete overreaction, they're recalling a product. it happens all the te and i think the stock is up 20%. >> brenda: i just like saying the name of the company. bull or bear. >> they don't get into yoga and high price valuation. >> brenda: toby, your prediction. >> all of these smart phones have done one thing, made the super memory off the chart, prices going up. and micron going up and-- >> gary b, bill or bear. >> i'm bearish, a little overbought right now. >> brenda: john your prediction. >> best buy turn around getting rave reviews, up. >> brenda: and toby. >> it's up 25% before it goes down 25%. >> brenda: jonas? >> okay. around word on street. bribing the tonight show to it move to new york city. the credit card-- >> bill or bear. >> letterman in new york-- >> and jay leno, and john ji carson and-- neil cavuto is up next. >> neil: the unions are starting to get loud, but is t
$7100. that's for an individual. for a family of four, the cheapest insurance that the government's going to allow you to buy is going to be over $20,000. now, you compare it to what the premiums are now for individuals, it's about $5,000 for an individual, that's the average price of private insurance, so you can just see an average of a little bit over 5,000 to over 7,000, and for a family of four the average right now is a little bit over $14,000. so that'll go up to 20,000. that's just going to happen with these exchanges when they get set up next year. of -- now, so that's the cost of insurance. but you were supposed to pay a fee or fine if you didn't have insurance. for somebody that makes about 50,000, that fine would be about 1600. if you make $100,000, it'd be over $2,000. but the thing is you really won't even have to pay that, even though that's already quite a bit less than the insurance would cost you. and the reason is because in the obamacare bill it's set up so that the irs, basically, will find it impossible to collect the money from anybody. you know, the irs, it
not have to deal with a government minder. i would use a cell phone and i hired a car from hotel, and call friends and get them to pass me to other people. so my goal was not to describe what saudi arabia ought to be like but try to understand and describe what it was like. saw want to talk today first about some observations about saudi society, in second about what those observations might portend about its ability or vulnerability, and then lastly, about scenarios that u.s. policymakers, which may someday include some of you in the audience, might face. saudi society, this probably should not have surprised me, but it did, it is much more diverse than we in the west think. there are people who live quite western lives inside their homes, and there are obviously people who seek to live a seventh century life. it is also much more divided than i realized, and much more dependent on government, because most people work for the government. the divisions are quite steep, so it's not in my view really a country as much as it is a collection of tribes with the flag. and it is divided by region
. this is their idea of government. everybody in the country needs to be paying attention to what the democrats and in some cases a handful of republicans are doing. at a time when we should be talking about transparency on the issues of our time. we are simply being brushed aside by imperious and elitist government. just a few days later, lawmakers admitted they were adopting law enforcement officers. imagine not. a month later, they said they wanted to use banned assault weapons. earlier this week, governor cuomo admitted that he had to amend the law. because it bans the sale of this. they didn't even think about that. the idiocy of the whole process is astounding. new report out today saying that governor cuomo is trying to lure th"tonight show" back to manhattan. that is right, nbc with three shows is trying to, well, basically dump the host of one of their three winning shows. these are brilliant people. right and to get the show back to manhattan providing 30 percent tax break if it decides to leave to caper but it is no secret that cuomo likes hollywood but shocking are his priorities. e
to have been shuttling military personnel and equipment to the syrian government over the air space of iraq which is, of course, supporting that horrible civil war in syria and that is something iran and iraq have both denied. good morning, everyone. welcome. >> great to have you here. last year, the iraqi government promised former secretary of state hillary clinton to inspect all of iranian flights so far that's reportedly not happening. now secretary kerry's turn to get it done. >> good morning. wink, wink, nudge, nhung from the iraqis to the iranians. the revolutionary guard soldiers to head from iran into syria to help assad. the united states has only pressured the iraqis privilege atly up until now. the fact they are doing so publicly and sharing intelligence means the shaming of iraq now begins. fox news was the first organization to report on the freight. the combination of everything from syrian airliners to shankar go planes. eye rain wran cargo planes, supply anything that syria needs. money, weapons and ammunition, soldiers. all those kinds of things from tehran into va
h. jackson once said it is not the function of our government to keep citizens from failing into error. it's the function of the citizens to keep the government from falling into error. this is it one of the main reasons i have applied to the appointment to the committee. first and foremost, i am proud to be a resident of san francisco and i believe as such i have a civic duty to ensure the city is running a matter consistent with financial stability and economic stability. in both my professional and civic capacity, i am tired with doing many of the duties retired by the committee. currently i am employed at blue shield of california and in this role i am a senior program manager of accountable care organization. my [speaker not understood] of a manager of acos is to drive quality of care and [speaker not understood] and cost of care indicators down. [speaker not understood]. and it is also to prepare blue shield of california for the influx of new members that will occur because of affordable care act. as part of my day to day role, i am constantly reviewing audits, budget
are governed not simply by men and women but by laws. we're fueled by entrepreneurship and innovation and we are defined by a democratic discourse that allows each generation to reimagine and renew our union once more. so in israel, we see value that is we share. even as we recognize what makes us different. that is an essential part of our bonds. now, i stand here today mindful that for both our nations these are some complicated times. we have difficult issues to work through within our own countries and we face dangers and upheavel around the world. and when i look at young people within the united states, i think about the choices they must make in their lives to define who will be as a nation in this 21st century particularly as we emerge from two wars and the worst recession since the great depression. but part of the reason i like talking to young people is because no matter how great the challenges are, their idealism, their energy, their ambition lways gives me hope. and i see the same spirit in the young people here today. i believe that you will shape our future and given the ties
or woman on the street who knew how to spend their dollar more wisely than a distant federal government, and he did all in his power to prove it by cutting taxes. when governor jeb bush was in office, he cut taxes on floridians by $20 billion. let's talk about the size of government. when ronald reagan was in the white house, he dramatically reduced the ate rah of growth in federal spending and strove to reduce the size of the federal government. when governor bush was in office, he vetoed more than $2.3 billion in earmarked for higher state spending and retuesdayed the size -- reduced the size of the state's government payroll by 13,000 people. when ronald reagan did that on the national level, he did it with a purpose in mind. it was to spur the free market, create opportunity and provide incentives for businesses to frau. in his years in office, over 20 million new jobs were created in governor bush's state of florida, his similar philosophy and economic programs created a thriving state economy where 1.4 million new net jobs were added during his time in office. there are other fund
-american? >> guest: no, at the moment we have an ongoing dispute with the reigning government, which itself produces all manner of vicious propaganda against the united states or at about the great and so forth. so are actually quite popular. they are among the most pro-american populations in the greater middle east that it's unusual to find -- pollsters have not been able to find populations filled in any country. you find the rise and fall of approval of u.s. policies, which can sometimes the rep to demonstration where the two disputes between governments that we then throw into this catchall category as to what the problem is this underlying hatred. even though public opinion changes radically month-to-month in year-to-year. germans arrest about their opinion of the u.s. president under george w. bush it fell to a low of 12% approval. within a couple years obama with the day. approval was 92%. it's people who can make discriminating judgment on the basis of how they assess the new leader of the same country and many western europeans in many places were unhappy with an inarticulate proponent of
and this government, not very cordial. imbued with a lot of tension. a lot coming back from the community of nations they have not really a implemented. i would say that it is all because of a constitution that failed the entire public at large. basically taking segments of society and addressing themselves to them. host: this unannounced trip that you just indicated in iraq, these officials with the president on his trip, the associated press pointed out that there were a series of meetings over flights. iran says that this is humanitarian aid and that syria is getting the weapons or else. guest: a whole concern, as the israelis feel that regardless of everything going on, they look to the north and in syria they see it disintegrating. weapons are flowing into the regime of the time. if we discussed the threat to iran stabilizing, weapons would also be a threat to the united states and its interest in the region. host: independent line, florida, welcome to the program. caller: welcome, gentlemen. i would like to posit, if i may, we are talking about netanyahu and israeli intransigence when it comes
to work states adding more jobs and with many in the government looking to cut more spending, is it time tore unions to simply get with the program? charles payne, dagen mcdowell, adam lashinsky, charlie gas pregas-- gasperino. >> and with the. >> i love the big raps. >> and communities with fewer presence of unions are doing better communities and businesses. the they drove hostess out of business and they have to figure out the dynamics. they've got to take a step back, we're trying to benefit and not in it for ourselves and the message doesn't get across anymore. >> neil: dagen? >> this is evidence of unions on the run. if you look at michigan, a huge move that that state, kind of the birth of unions as we know it in this country, is now a right to work state, but what you see -- you're starting to see the down and dirty tactics. a lot of unions in that state tried to do or are doing like is run around the law, but putting in place like wayne state university, forexample, mandatory dues must be paid by the unions for periods of years, eight years in just that case. you're seeing it al
take. those of you who followed the show regularly know that i have long argued that cutting government spending if the midst of a weak recovery is not a path toward growth. i have also argued that america has a debt and deficit problem and we need to take it very seriously. the fact is that the vast majority of our problem is related to the cost of health care in america. now the debate over obama care is over, we should start to think seriously of how to get america's health care costs under control. as it turns out a book and magazine story provide ways to think of this. the central debate between republicans and democrats is over whether the free market works well in health care. in a new book catastrophic care, they make the case arguing people need ito become consumers of health care so they, not insurance companies or the government, actually see, feel and pay the bill. that will force producers of health care, doctors and hospitals to push down prices and drive up quality. that's what happens with groceries, tv sets or computers. and basic surgery has seen a 90% drop in price an
arm the syrian government, although it rawn insists it is humanitarian aid. the u.s. has asked iraq to force the planes to land in iraq for inspections. but only a few have been checked. they have long been a point of conflict between the and u.s. iraq. >> the intent here, fwy going public, is to increase the pressure on al-malma laki. but it shows how minimal our ability to affect the conflict in syria has become. >> kerry said that iraq can be be part of the political discussion about syria's future until cracks down on the iranian shipments. >> shannon: thank you very much. the head of the western-backed opposition in syria is supportedly stepping down, resigning out what have he calls frustration with a lack of international efforts to oust the leader assad. >> this resignation is really shows how fragmented the syrian opposition is and even if assad were to fall, the western allies don't know who to call and talk to. right now, the syrian opposition is in two camps. you have the free syrian army, the locals who have risen up against the regime. but on the other side, have you e
'm not against any kind of checking, i would prefer the government to be the policeman and not the business man. it is rare, whether it happens, business men who have expenses to do this or whether government should do it. >> chris: let's talk about your idea which is important to you, it should be congress. according to the gang of 8 plan, it would be governors and a commission and they'd decide whether or not the border is secure. you want congress to get into this. and there are some republicans who say you are setting up the g.o.p. for a fall because it will be a vote in congress and it will be political. a lot of republicans will say, gee, we are not satisfied with border security. and, that will only increase their sense of separation from hispanic voters. >> i would argue the opposite. i would argue that you are only going to get the conservatives, particularly a republican house, to pass immigration reform, if we as conservatives are reassured that the border is controlled and that we get their vote on whether -- to vote on whether the border is controlled. we have not believed in the p
general control of the government presentation to the supreme court. the petitions to file, what responses to file, oral argument in the solicitor general also decides in the government will appeal an adverse decisions by district court or the court of appeals. the solicitor general has authority to decide when a federal they meet the eye and the supreme court or court of appeals. it's a broad portfolio that requires a large base of knowledge plus the ability to learn fast. the solicitor general does not control with y and doesn't start the process within the justice department feared cases that a writer for out to litigating division civil, criminal and thÉrÈse, and grants a natural resource and environment. then make recommendations, which go to the assistance. sometimes there's an internal conflict. the department of justice include the criminal division and those people always want to defend guards and seized their presence. sublimates divisions tends to favor and somebody has to resolve those on assistant to the solicitor general may think the criminal division statutory. prosecutio
for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to show another application from motion launch, the founder and ceo, john, will be sharing some of the work that they're doing. they're based here out of san francisco and they've got a great announcement to make. >> i am jon mills. i'm ceo of motion loft. we started about three years ago developing sensors that we could place around cities that would give us some analytics on how people move around cities and how vehicles drive around cities. so, currently we have 16 neighborhoods -- 18 neighborhoods covered in san francisco, and we get real-time data back that shows exactly h
that actually the keiser family foundation website gives better explains than the government's. >> okay. the keiser family foundation? >> foundation website. >> uh-huh. >> kff.org. >> uh-huh. >> we love the keiser family foundation. and that is an excellent website. i know that one. >> yes. >> what else would you think, if you're sitting on this side as a consumer whereas you're a healthcare provider, as a physician, what is the most important thing a consumer needs to know? about this plan? >> one thing they need to know is that there are limitations that actually courages really loved. people who have flexible savings accounts, their health savings account have more limitations on those. >> uh. >> to raise tax dollars to pay for the other things. >> right. >> that new health savings accounts can't be used to buy over-the-counter medications. >> aha. >> and there is a dollar limit on flexible savings accounts that used to be limited. >> okay. >> and income tax wise, it used to be that you can deduct your medical expenses at a lower tax rate. now, you have to spend 10% of your income in
people's bank accounts to pay back the government debt. can you imagine if our government tried to do ha? they are working on a last-ditch effort to bail out cypress, as european stocks plunged. there are concerns. u.s. investors watching for a deal, hours before our markets open in the morning. on the table in cypress, a possible tax on bank deposits and austerity measures that could result in the loss of thousands of jobs. that has sparked a protest. welcome to a brand-new hour of america's news headquarters. >> jamie: good to see you. good morning, to all of you. it happens that time is running out fast in cypress. if they can't reach a deal, the european central bank will stop providing emergency funds to cypress after monday, triggering a collapse of the country's banks. greg? >> shannon: hey, jamie, eric. it is crunch time here in cyprus. the economic fate of the country could be decide in the next several hours. all of europe and the united states is watching. the action rate now is in brussels. officials are meeting with the top brass at the u.u., the european central bank. they
branches of the arizona state government in the preceding years and of course, i have left the track record and i think the president had sent people out to uncover the press coverage of anything i was involved with and to look at papers in connection with a record. i guess they had not uncovered anything to looks scary so he decided to do that. i was at home the day they've wanted to come now to talk to me. my husband and i had built a sun-dried adobe house in the phoenix area 1957. that was a challenge you could buy the other kind but in this country today it is very hard to buy a sun-dried adobe bricks that somebody has made then dried and in a frame in the sun and that is what we've wanted to use. i ate them and in scottsdale to build some houses like that and he could tell us how to get sun-dried adobe so we followed his advice and found a starving young architect who was willing to designed a house so we got it built and i loved it. it was so fun until you see it and touch it you probably cannot appreciate why i liked it so much but it looks good, it feels good good, and it is wonderf
the way we viewed citizen involvement in government, changing the way we think about our elected officials and the ability to create up star movements. i think all that was incredibly important and the beginning of the women's movement all that great activism that it produced and all of that we are seeing that directly play out today whether it's the election of barack obama or the continued advancement of women in congress so all that is a direct result of their activism. that being said there is a lot of work left undone and i think that we now spend three fourths of our entitlement money on people who are over the age of 30 and it used to be we spent three for some people under the age of 30 in terms of the amount of money and investment. it's not in terms of generational warfare but i think we need to have a conversation about how we are dividing our priorities. this is not a generation that expects to get those entitlements by the way. this is not a generation that has and he believes the government going to give them out money. >> host: the activism you talked about from the baby boo
representatives of the black community. the community had to govern in our own interest and we will take that honor make that happen. the idea was not just about standing up to the police. it never was from the beginning. the party was very much about creating stewardship and self governance and community self-governance. while the initial development of the party and the national threat was there the strategy of self-defense, a lot of what became really the center of a party practice in 69 and onward was free brac is for children and community programs about taking care the community. here you had the war on poverty and yet you had children starving here in the united states. the black panther party said we are going to feed the children in our community. this was the breakfast program and they had liberation -- i want to say a word about the party. the party was attacked by the federal government not only is an organization that's really the history and the political possibility of the party was attacked. if you look at the documents of j. edgar hoover thinking about the threat of the
are faced with a government reaching into their personal bank accounts to pay its bills. this is not like a tax. it's a smash and grab. the government runs the banks, so when they're failing and need money, they could keep the deposits that the citizens have inside their accounts. cyprus needs to come up with 7 1/2 billion dollars on its on in order to get the european unions to loan it the rest of the money to keep the country running. it's like matching funds in a highway and in belgium holding last minute talks with european leaders. they better talk quickly because the european bank has been giving emergency cash to cyprus to keep the banks there afloat. that cash stops tomorrow if there's no deal in the works. some pictures now from earlier. citizens filling the streets in panics and their businesses hurting from no cash flow and the atm's shut down. and they're worried the government will take their money. greg palkot is in cyprus and brenda buttner in the studio. let's go to graeg. what's the latest for cyprus. >> reporter: harris, it looks like it's going to be an all-nighter. an
in the united states. combating it requires government solutions. there's not a better time in my life when things have been as dangerous as it is today in the threats more diverse. due to the planned budget cuts, we are posed to cut our defense budget by $8 trillion in the next 10 years. we're talking about what has are to come out of the budget. another half killing would come through sequestration. it is interesting that that is the only area where this administration has been actively cutting government. it addresses the need for a national military strategy to reflect the global security environment. the military, and the growing budget, currently the current strategy as well. starting with the strategic guidance issued in january 2012. it seems that we are falling into a trap of creating strategies entirely on how quickly we can cut defense budgets rather than as a result give an honest assessment. i am very much concerned. i always thought that the major mission of the federal government is to protect the homeland. we have to get back to that mentality and recognize the threat and yo
approved legislation to fund the government through the end of september. that avoids the risk of a partial federal shutdown. in the process, they are on spring break for a couple weeks. what's your take on this? >> my take is the whole financial dysfunction of our congress is mind blowing. you look at this week. let's say frederick, maryland, where there's air traffic control that will be shut. a tower that was built and refurbished by the stimulus money. so stimulus money went into this tower. the government saying it's a priority. and the the government because of its dysfunction saying we have to shut is down. that's a perfect representation, i think, of how washington is not doing its job. we can't even pass a budget. it can't even run the books. there's no strategy. when you look at some of the forced spending cuts, you see exactly a lack of strategy in american finances. that's a real problem. >> complaining about this for months. when i say fedex, you probably think of the guys coming to deliver a package. what you should think about is fedex as a gauge of the global economy. fedex
is doing smart analytics. i think that's what you'll see happening as well, government starts to become smarter, make better decisions, better policies. this term algorithmic regulation, which means you can have laws and policies in the cities determined by data and not just what we think is best, but what's actually best. so, as cities keep catching on and more and more with the data, you're going to see some really interesting things coming out. >> cool. while we're talking about data, another part of the announcement today was also motion loft making private data available within sort of that initiative and that website wrieri'd like to hear a little more, john, about kind of deciding to share that data with the city and also a lot of times especially with other companies you see them being very protective of their data. there is a lot of value there. how do you sort of balance, protecting the value of your data and commercial viability versus making it available to the public? >> so, we have a unique problem, i think, to a lot of start-ups in the fact that we have a product that we
of the challenges he's facing putting together his new government and obama basically said, well, talk to me about it. look what my problems on capitol hill are, and netanyahu said, yeah, but we have more moving parts over here, parts in our country don't move at all, that's the problem. >> i had my doubts about whether or not he was going to shift netanyahu's opinion on him. i felt that from the -- remember that photototof netanyahu and obama sitting on the couch in the white house? >> the oval office. >> do you remember that? >> sure. being lectured. >> the whole body posture and so forth. but some of the video emerging from this trip is so authentic and even the words of netanyahu describing obama and what he means, what obama means to him in this relationship. a true friend. it was very authentic. >> yes, i think it was. and i think they did have, for the first time really, the kind of environment and personal contact within that environment that made this all possible, and they all both know, and certainly they know how important a good personal relationship is on an issue as complicated and
that engine that they used in the campaign and make it work for them and governing. when they made their press transscripts available on the record, the press secretary james haggard was very interested in getting things out directly. he said in one of his diary entries, to hell with reporters, we'll go directly to the people. those have to do with what the president is doing inside the white house, and then that information spreads. so you can have smgs like "the huffington post" thinking i could simply go around them in the white house press corps is irrelevant. it remains very relevant. >> the white house issues a photograph of the president in any setting, but it is only a society photo. are news organizations becoming reluctant to use that photo? >> it is really quite the opposite. they have started picking up that image on flicker. what you see is the white house photographer is there to photograph the president, not the presidency, not what's happening in the white house, but solely the president. and i think that that really limits what the public knows. >> martha joynt kumar, the aut
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